Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

New PECS Webinar on polycentricity and power dynamics

Hi All!

I wanted to share the recording of our latest webinar with Praneeta Mudaliar available at the following link.

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Title: Power dynamics in Lake Victoria’s Polycentric fisheries

Abstract:

Polycentric governance involves many overlapping, semi-autonomous centers of authority that are engaged in self-organization, coordination, and mutual adjustment. The many benefits of polycentric governance—flexibility, responsiveness, inclusivity, institutional fit, opportunities for experimentation and innovation, and robustness—make it attractive compared to monocentric governance. While polycentricity is certainly not a panacea, research on polycentric governance, specifically power dynamics among centers of authority, challenges these normative prescriptions. Studies find that different kinds of power influence the emergence as well as the design of polycentric systems to result in maladaptive outcomes. In this presentation, by drawing upon the polycentric power typology, I will provide insights into the power dynamics underpinning Lake Victoria’s polycentric fisheries system in east Africa.  

Bio:
Praneeta Mudaliar is an Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies and Sciences at Ithaca College in New York, USA. Praneeta’s interdisciplinary social scientific research and teaching spans across the themes of commons and collective action, climate justice and climate policy, and decolonizing conservation for advancing social justice and environmental sustainability. She has conducted cross-national empirical research in the United States, India, Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda.

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This is the latest webinar on methodological approaches to studying collaborative governance and management of social-ecological systems as part of the Programme on Ecosystem Change and Society (PECS) working group on collaborative governance. All past webinars can be found at: https://www.incommonpodcast.org/series/pecs-webinars/

New PECS Webinar on Indigenous Futures Thinking


Hi All!

I wanted to share this recording of a recent webinar by Julia van Velden.  A link to the recording is available here.


Title: Indigenous Futures Thinking: An Innovation Seeking Review

Abstract:

Futures Thinking is a way to help individuals or organisations understand processes of change, so that better, wiser and preferred futures can be created. Futures Thinking suggests that there are many conceivable alternative versions of the future, and it is possible to prepare for and accept this uncertainty. In the face of major social and environmental change expected within this century, such work is expected to become more and more urgent. This review summarises the current knowledge about Futures Thinking undertaken by Indigenous groups around the world. This study draws from multiple different fields, including health, business and economics, but focusses specifically on issues of environmental sustainability. Best-practice recommendations for conducting Indigenous Futures Thinking work will be discussed, along with how this approach can generate unique insights, while recognising some of its methodological and social difficulties. Innovative examples of Futures Thinking work by Indigenous groups will be shared, highlighting connections and creating opportunities for knowledge sharing.


Bio:
Julia van Velden is a conservation social scientist, working as a postdoctoral fellow with CSIRO Australia. Her work aims to bring together diverse knowledge systems to tackle sustainability and conservation problems. Her current focus is on using participatory research methods for futures thinking, and aims to facilitate the creation of future scenarios for the Great Barrier Reef, working with Traditional Owners to identify pathways for an inclusive, resilient reef system. She has previously conducted research on a range of environmental issues, including illegal wildlife trade and human-wildlife conflict.


This is the latest webinar on methodological approaches to studying collaborative governance and management of social-ecological systems as part of the Programme on Ecosystem Change and Society (PECS) working group on collaborative governance. All past webinars can be found at: https://www.incommonpodcast.org/series/pecs-webinars/Open document settingsOpen publish panel

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New PECS Webinar on Collaborative and Indigenous Science


Hi All!

I wanted to share this recording of a recent webinar by Pia Harkness.  A link to the recording is available here.


Title: The Our Knowledge Our Way in Caring for Country Guidelines: distilling guiding principles for best practice, Indigenous-led knowledge, sharing from case study examples

Abstract:

As significant landowners, managers and custodians, Indigenous Australians are applying their knowledges in land and sea management, generating many social, economic and environmental benefits. In contemporary land and sea management contexts, there are many challenges for both Indigenous peoples and their partners when sharing and working with Indigenous knowledge. Knowledge has previously been misappropriated and misused; commercially exploited without benefits flowing to communities, used without consent and in ways that are considered harmful by Traditional Custodians. Therefore, there is an urgent need for examples of good, Indigenous-led practices for strengthening and sharing knowledge. The Indigenous-led Our Knowledge Our Way in caring for Country guidelines aims to help address this need, by showcasing case studies of best practices in knowledge sharing from across Australia. The guidelines are based on the guiding principle that Indigenous people must decide what is best practice when working with their knowledge. This presentation will focus on the Indigenous-led approach to development of these guidelines, including the role of non-Indigenous scientists. It will also discuss how guiding principles were distilled from the case studies, to support improved knowledge sharing practices across a wide range of contexts.


Bio:
Dr Pia Harkness is a social scientist with a focus on collaborative natural resource management and sustainable livelihoods. Her PhD research investigated the livelihood implications of conservation and development interventions, and prospects for small-scale fisheries co-management in a remote Indonesian setting. In her current role as Research Projects Officer at CSIRO, Australia’s national science agency, her work focusses on bringing together multiple knowledge and value systems to support Indigenous-led land and sea management and climate change adaptations.


This is the latest webinar on methodological approaches to studying collaborative governance and management of social-ecological systems as part of the Programme on Ecosystem Change and Society (PECS) working group on collaborative governance. All past webinars can be found at: https://www.incommonpodcast.org/series/pecs-webinars/

New PECS Webinar with Örjan Bodin on Networks and Environmental Governance


Hi All!

I wanted to share this recording of a recent webinar by Örjan Bodin.  A link to the recording is available here.


Title: Environmental governance and human-nature interactions: A network perspective

Abstract:

Achieving effective, sustainable environmental governance requires a better understanding of the causes and consequences of the complex patterns of interdependencies connecting people and ecosystems. Network thinking provides a way to make these patterns of interdependencies the subject of empirical enquiry. In this talk I will demonstrate how multilevel social-ecological network modeling has been used to study environmental outcomes in small-scale fisheries and agriculture. I will also show how this multilevel network approach can be applied studying how actors working with different tasks, or policy issues, choose to engage in collaboration (or not), and what the consequences of these choices can be.


Bio:
Assoc. Prof. Örjan Bodin is a principal researcher at the Stockholm Resilience Centre at Stockholm University. He received his PhD from the Dept of Systems Ecology at Stockholm University 15 years ago, and has since been studying environmental governance in different contexts around the world. Most of his work is inherently interdisciplinary and he combines and integrates methods and theories (where applicable) from ecology, political science, sociology, behavioral economics, and network science.


This is the latest webinar on methodological approaches to studying collaborative governance and management of social-ecological systems as part of the Programme on Ecosystem Change and Society (PECS) working group on collaborative governance. All past webinars can be found at: https://www.incommonpodcast.org/series/pecs-webinars/

New PECS Webinar with Josie Chambers on Knowledge Co-Production

Hi All!

I wanted to share this recording of a recent webinar by Josie Chambers.  A link to the recording is available here.


Title: Opening up the co-production black box for ecosystem sustainability

Abstract:

Researchers and diverse societal actors increasingly co-produce knowledge and action to address complex sustainability challenges. These efforts span an increasingly rich and diverse body of terminologies and practices. However, there is poor clarity over the specific ways these approaches vary, and their practical implications. To explore this diversity, we analyzed 32 initiatives from six continents that co-produce diverse outcomes for ecosystem sustainability at local to global scales. The analysis revealed important ways that co-production initiatives vary in their purpose for utilizing co-production, understanding of power, approach to politics, and pathways to impact. This webinar will explore the implications of these differences and present a heuristic tool that helps navigate the potential benefits and risks of different approaches to co-producing knowledge and action for ecosystem sustainability.

Bio:
Josie Chambers is a Postdoctoral Researcher and Lecturer in the Forest and Nature Conservation Policy Group at Wageningen University, the Netherlands. Her research broadly examines the politics and implications of multi-scalar approaches to co-producing knowledge and transformative governance. In her current role, she organizes a university-wide dialogue process that connects diverse researchers to develop more transformative research pathways and foster institutional change. Josie was previously based at the University of Cambridge, completing an MPhil in Conservation Leadership, PhD in Geography, and two post-doctoral fellowships.


This is the latest webinar on methodological approaches to studying collaborative governance and management of social-ecological systems as part of the Programme on Ecosystem Change and Society (PECS) working group on collaborative governance. All past webinars can be found at: https://www.incommonpodcast.org/series/pecs-webinars/

New PECS Webinar with Ramiro Berardo on Online Teaching!

Hi All!

I wanted to share this recording of a recent webinar by Ramiro Berardo on online education.  A link to the recording is available here.


Title: Tips for Increasing Student Engagement and Improving your Effectiveness as an Online Teacher

Abstract:

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, the transition to online education has accelerated and educators all over the world have had to quickly adapt to the need to offering online courses. This has posed major disruptions in teaching practices but also created new, exciting opportunities to embrace new instructional approaches and update the ever changing “teaching toolkit.” In this presentation, I offer a number of simple tips that I have found to increase student engagement and improve my performance as an instructor in synchronous and asynchronous online courses. These lessons are drawn from individual experience, but they can at the very least enrich a conversation on ways in which instructional effectiveness can be improved in a context of rapidly evolving teaching (and learning!) styles. 

Bio:

Ramiro Berardo is Associate Professor of Environmental and Natural Resources Policy in the School of Environment and Natural Resources at The Ohio State University. He holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Florida State University.


This is the latest webinar on methodological approaches to studying collaborative governance and management of social-ecological systems as part of the Programme on Ecosystem Change and Society (PECS) working group on collaborative governance. All past webinars can be found at: https://www.incommonpodcast.org/series/pecs-webinars/

New PECS Webinar on Machine Learning and Community-based Natural Resource Management

Hi All!

I wanted to share this recording of a recent webinar by Graham Epstein on using machine learning to better understand how to improve community-based natural resource management.  A link to the recording is available here.


Title: The Commons Synthesis Project: Applying machine learning to synthesize knowledge on community-based natural resource management

Abstract:

There is an emerging paradox in the literature on the commons in which rapid growth in the availability of information about community-based natural resource management is coupled with the relatively slow advances in terms of theory and practice.  This paradox stems from a number of important factors, including practical constraints in terms of the time and cognitive abilities of researchers to read and synthesize knowledge from hundreds of potentially relevant papers, as well as a growing consensus that social and environmental outcomes depend upon interactions among a wide range of social, ecological and institutional factors.  The Commons Synthesis Project, established at the University of Central Florida, aims to respond to this challenge by leveraging advances in natural language processing and machine learning to develop insights from the literature and legacy large-n databases of community-based natural resource management.  This webinar will provide an introduction to these approaches, the underlying motivation for using them, and discuss recent applications.

Bio:

Graham Epstein is a Postdoctoral Researcher in the School of Politics, Security and International Affairs at the University of Central Florida.  His research examines a number of questions at the intersections of society, the environment and institutions with the aim of developing a better understanding of collective action, compliance and sustainable natural resources management.  He completed a PhD in Public Policy at Indiana University and has also held teaching and research positions at the University of Waterloo, and has worked in policy practice with the Government of Ontario.     


This is the latest webinar on methodological approaches to studying collaborative governance and management of social-ecological systems as part of the Programme on Ecosystem Change and Society (PECS) working group on collaborative governance. All past webinars can be found at: https://www.incommonpodcast.org/series/pecs-webinars/

New PECS Webinar on Adaptive Water Governance


Hi All!

I wanted to share this recording of a recent webinar by Micaela Trimble on adaptive water governance in Latin America.  A link to the recording is available here.

Title: Learning from water crises in South America: towards adaptive water governance?

Abstract: Similar to the whole world, South America faces numerous water-related crises and challenges (e.g. water quantity and quality scarcity) due to climate change, land use, governance systems, and other such factors. Based on the GovernAgua research project, this webinar focuses on adaptive water governance in contexts of crisis in Argentina, Brazil, and Uruguay. The objective is to analyse the recent water crises affecting drinking water supply in three watersheds—turbidity in the Chubut river (Patagonia, Argentina) in 2017, drought in the Piracicaba-Capivari-Jundiaí river basins (São Paulo, Brazil) in 2014-2015, and algal blooms in the Laguna del Sauce lake (Maldonado, Uruguay) in 2015. The role of Basin committees (involving government and nongovernment actors) in their response to water crises is also analyzed. The methods used included semi-structured interviews, virtual workshops, participant observation, and document analysis. The findings show that the consequences of the crises were diverse, including enhanced communication among actors at multiple levels (Argentinian and Uruguayan cases), incorporation of climate components in the basin management plan (Brazilian case), and emergence of social mistrust regarding the quality of drinking water (Uruguayan case). In addition, limitations faced by Basin committees in addressing water-related crises were identified.

Bio: 

Micaela Trimble holds a Doctoral degree in Natural Resources and Environmental Management from the University of Manitoba (Canada). She was a postdoctoral fellow of the Centre for Marine Studies – Federal University of Parana (Brazil), and at the Environmental Sustainability Research Centre – Brock University (Canada). She is currently an Associate at the South American Institute for Resilience and Sustainability Studies (SARAS), in Uruguay, where she is PI of two research projects on water governance. She is also a member of the National System of Researchers of Uruguay. Her areas of expertise include public participation, adaptive governance, and adaptive co-management of social-ecological systems, such as small-scale fisheries and watersheds.


This is the latest webinar on methodological approaches to studying collaborative governance and management of social-ecological systems as part of the Programme on Ecosystem Change and Society (PECS) working group on collaborative governance.

New PECS webinar on lab experimentation and cooperation


Hi All!

I wanted to share this recording of a recent webinar by Astrid Dannenberg on lab experimentation and cooperation.  A link to the recording is available here.

Title: Cooperation and institution formation in the lab

Abstract: This lecture will summarize what we have learned about cooperation and institutions formation through running lab experiments. Specifically, we will talk about people’s abilities to cooperate and form institutions to solve cooperation problems. Lab experiment are somewhat artificial, but they have the advantage of eliciting real (non-hypothetical) decisions under highly controlled conditions, allowing researchers to identify causal effects in a clean way. The results of this literature show that standard economics theory, based on rational and self-interested actors, often is too pessimistic when it comes to human cooperation, but sometimes is too optimistic when it comes to choosing the best institution.

Bio: Astrid Dannenberg is Professor of Environmental and Behavioral Economics at the University of Kassel, Germany. Her research focuses on human decision making, the drivers and barriers of cooperation, and how institutions can be designed to promote cooperation. Astrid received her M.Sc. in economics at the University of Mannheim and her PhD at the Otto-von-Guericke-University of Magdeburg. She previously was a Research Fellow at the Centre for European Economic Research in Mannheim, the University of Gothenburg, and Columbia University in New York City.


This is the latest webinar on methodological approaches to studying collaborative governance and management of social-ecological systems as part of the Programme on Ecosystem Change and Society (PECS) working group on collaborative governance.

New Webinar on Geospatial Analysis and Environmental Governance

Hi All!

I wanted to share this recording of a webinar by Tom Evans on geospatial analysis and environmental social science.  A link to the recording is available here.

Title: Application of Geospatial Analysis to Investigate Community-Level Water Governance in Kenya

Bio: Tom Evans is a professor in the School of Geography, Development and Environment at the University of Arizona (USA). He investigates climate impacts and adaptation processes in smallholder agroecosystems as related to food and water security. Recent projects have investigated the spatial and temporal characteristics of drought events in Zambia and Kenya and the mechanisms utilized by farmers in rainfed and irrigated systems to mitigate those impacts. This work involves investigation of household level decision-making dynamics, institutional analysis/environmental governance, and integration of social-environmental data. Newer work is investigating the teleconnections between rural food production and urban food security through analysis of urban food systems. 


This is the latest webinar on methodological approaches to studying collaborative governance and management of social-ecological systems as part of the Programme on Ecosystem Change and Society (PECS) working group on collaborative governance.